Worldwide Knit In Public Day: A Recapitulation

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WKIP with Yankee Yarns at The Redgate Inn 10/06/17

There is no way of sugar-coating it. We dropped the ball of yarn. There is no sense in making excuses. Before you read on, know that there is a slightly inappropriate photograph coming up later in this blog. If you are an individual of delicate sensibilities, you may want to stop reading when you get to the group photo.

All others, carry on… And Carry On Knit In Public Day!

“It kind of snuck up on us,” said Resident Designer Jenny as I walked into the shop last Friday afternoon. “Worldwide Knit in Public Day. It’s tomorrow. We kind of forgot.” She giggled. I put my things down, pulled up a chair and gazed at her.

“It’s not too late, though,” I said. “It’s tomorrow. I can be there. You can be there. We can call up the troops, surely?” We both looked at each other then looked out the window across the street from the shop. We both smiled and said in unison:

“Pub?”

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Redgate Inn, Ladybrook Mansfield Notts

Ok, so yes. It was most certainly a last-minute event for us. We basically just picked up our stuff and met at the Redgate Inn at 2pm on Saturday 10th of June. There were six of us including a newbie we wrapped up into our colourful abyss of madness.

Danielle Landes started World Wide Knit In Public Day in 2005. It always takes place on the second Saturday of June every year so how it snuck up on us, I have no idea. I mean it’s only just the greatest, knitter-run, global knitting circle EVER! The event began as a way for knitters (and hookers, ) to get together, enjoy each other’s company, ideas and hints. But it is also to show off our obsession. Knitting and crochet are usually very solitary endeavours. So it is so nice to see all the images of knitters getting together in town centres, national parks, city parks, city libraries, street parties, university campuses, restaurants and…. pubs.

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Left to right: Julie, Janet, Angela, Our Fearless Leader Sara & Resident Designer Jenny

For it to have been a last-minute thing, it really did turn out rather well. We came prepared with all the yarn to make poppies for our event in November. But there was a lot of wine, cider and beer. Another diversion was the strange phallic bottle opener that took us a bit by surprise. There was a fair bit of laughing over it. Afterall, we are jolly good sports and women of the world! Bottle openers come in all shapes in sizes. Who are we to judge! Mind you, it was quite a gratuitous tool and perhaps rather awkward to handle. However such things like this are rather necessary to our requirements and we made use of the wood…. to open bottles… Moving right along…

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The less said the better…

The Redgate Inn is a welcoming place. It is dog friendly so it really is a great stop after an evening walk. This has been our Knit In Public venue for two years now. Last year, we had been more prepared. There was a raffle and more people knew about it so more people came. But we thank the pub landlord and staff for making our small group feel at home!

Our Fearless Leader Sara bought the first round. I started with wine but being a newly installed member of CAMRA , I moved on to beer. It was a half pint of Prior’s Well Brewery pale ale named Incensed. Absolutely lovely!

As Yankee Yarns Resident Writer, I began to document the afternoon. As the hours merged into one another, I rather lost my way. I am not sure if there was a whole lot of knitting going on but it was a great afternoon. Had it not been for other commitments like Angela being summoned home to feed Baby Ezra (to be fair, Daddy did not have the proper tools for this, if you get my meaning), we may have all stayed on into the evening. We may have even closed the pub! I slammed down the remains of another swift half,  collected my knitting de trucs,  and skulked off home with my WIP poppy. I sat down to finish the poppy but instead polished off a lovely 2015 Bordeaux Blason de Montbelly whilst listening to some bluegrass music and scribbling down notes about the afternoon.

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Laissez les bons temps rouler!

I look forward to next year’s event. It will not get lost on our radar next time. We have just had so many planned events in the diary as of late. This is great news for Yankee Yarns!

One of those events a repeat of the Sock Clinic we had a few months ago. This one will be delivered at our second site, Unique and Beautiful, at 30 Outram St, Sutton-in-Ashfield NG17 4FS.

The two-part Sock Clinic will be on 22nd July & 5th August from Noon to 2pm

It was such a successful event last time when we held it at the Yankee Yarns HQ in Mansfield.

 

 

 

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Middle right photo: Resident Writer Ann. (Me!) “I had every intention to get going with the poppies. Then beer happened.”
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clockwise: 1. Angela’s creation. 2. Angela smiles!  3. Janet and daughter Angela
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Remains of the day!!!!!

I Dream Of Jeanie

 

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Stitch marker found on ETSY

 

Going into the Yankee Yarn shop is a little like going over to my cousin’s house. Our Fearless Leader Sara is from Louisiana and I am from Texas. We are kindred spirits not only bound together by our birth nation or the fact that we boldly set out to make our ex-Pat existence nothing short of awesome sauce. Of course, we have the whole knitting connection and we are both Mums of crazy dual national children. But our easy friendship sparked because we recognised we were both surreptitious rebels.

 

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Resident Experimenter Nori & Resident Designer Jen

In fact, Resident Designer Jen and even our lovely, serene Resident Experimenter Nori have a maverick streak in them. Most of the ladies that come into the shop have a bit of an untamed flair about them, to be fair. The knitting shop is like an outlaw’s hangout and we are all like wild, Wild West gunslingers— only our holsters hold balls of yarn and we are armed with hooks and needles.

 

 

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Stylecraft Pattern

So when Stylecraft came out with an exciting, new yarn “that captures the spirit and heritage of the denim” that is, incidentally, the trend this season, it made all of our eyes big with wonder. Jeanie Denim Look is inspired by the timeless and classic hues of denim. It is available in 100g balls in four shades: Dixie, Memphis, Delta, and (to my heart’s joy) Texas. The colours go from the retro 70s indigos to lighter blues like the stonewashed fashions of the 80s. Imagine the pieces you can make! Whatever your denim style — country western, rocker, chic, student-look—it is all up to you!

 

It is aran weight yarn, but its cotton acrylic blend means you can throw it in the wash and tumble dry without ruining the garment. It is soft. One of our customers said it was like working with chenille. Another said it was like working with velvet.

“Fuzzy feel good to the touch,” said Yolie Hume. “I am working on a cable sweater and it just feels so lush!”

“On circulars, it doesn’t snag,” said Becca MacDougal. “It does not split either. “ The yarn keeps its integrity even after you have to pull it all back and start over.

“I wish I could blink like I Dream Of Jeanie and have a sweater,” Said Our Fearless Leader Sara.

We have the patterns in the shop and will be getting more. I am thinking of challenging Our Resident Designer Jen to whip up a western style cardigan to go with my sundress, cowboy boots and Stetson. Watch this space.

Go Forth And Knit!

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The days are growing longer and it is almost time for the clocks to Spring Forward in the UK. The anticipation of the extra light has us all abuzz like fantastical little buzzy bees. Although there are still the same 24 hours in the day, the perception that we will all have so much more time to go and do stuff is down to how far up we are in the hemisphere. The sun just goes on and on. Those of us lucky enough to live in Scotland will enjoy the daylight far into the wee hours of the next day! This just makes me happy. In addition, there is the promise of a plethora of social events coming up. There will be music festivals, art festivals, food festivals and car festivals. The things that all these festivals have in common is there is plenty of downtime to sit, have a natter and work on our projects. As they say, Spring has sprung!

The energy is through the roof, yo.

I’mma gonna slap me a stitch!

knit purl to do listMaking a “To-Do” list.

So here we go. There are a few things we might want to do to plan our hazy lazy days in the sun. After all, winter comes around so quickly. We need to make the best of the light we get! Now, I know what you are thinking (and you are right.) You are factoring in those days of Spring showers that always threaten us with darkness. There is one happening right now. But when the showers come, I use the time to think and make lists. Remember, all showers pass! Here is my list so far

  1. Make some chicks for charity. These are little hollow chicks that are quick to make. You can fit Cadbury Cream Eggs inside them and sell at church or school fundraising events. I bought some years ago. After Easter, I sewed them onto a Memory Quilt for my son. Every year I add on to the quilt. The idea is that it will grow with my son.
  2. Learn how to make my own patterns. Knitwear and crochet trends for this Spring are all over the fashion blogs. So many of them feature pretty lacework or loopy designs with contrasting colours. Our Resident Designer Jenny says it really is quite satisfying making your own designs and it really just takes a bit of patience. Yankee Yarns plans to deliver a workshop on patterns soon. Keep checking back!
  3. Attend a Worldwide Knit In Public Day event on Saturday, June 18th.
    Last year, Our Fearless Leader Sara organised the event at the Redgate Pub next door to the shop. There was a raffle with great prizes. This year promises to be an even bigger event as the knitting & crochet community has grown exponentially.
  4. Recruit Knitting/Crochet apostles! There is nothing like getting some newbies onboard and then taking them to the knitting in public event! Once they are in… THEY ARE REALLY IN.
  5. Hitting my steps and counting my stitches ON-THE-GO! I read a story of a runner who knitted whilst running in the New York Marathon! Now, I don’t think I could go for a run and knit at the same time but I could definitely walk and get my 10k steps a day whilst I knit. The key is to make a yarn holster that would hold my ball of wool. I need the exercise but I need to knit even more. This will be perfect for the long days!
  6. Plan a Knitting Holiday with the ladies in the circle.

You may chuckle at the last one, but is it so far-fetched? What could be better than finding a really pretty place, pouring some prosecco into a glass in the middle of the day and knitting with my gregarious posse? It is actually a thing! It could be as simple as getting our camping equipment and striking out in the Big Country with our WIPs and needles. Or it could be something more structured like the Knitting Retreat In France.

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Last year, I booked into Southpark House   in Locharbriggs. The breakfast is amazing there! I went to visit the Valais Blacknose Sheep. It was a love affair.I did get a bit distracted by other lovely activities at the time. The visit was all too short. I think the next time I will make sure I stay longer and wear comfier clothes. The sheep were super friendly at feeding time!

So, there. I’ve given you plenty to think about. Let’s get out there and knit all the things!!!!

knit all the things

Hooked on Colour

With the recent grey, blustery weather and the general in-between-y kind of mood of this time of year, who doesn’t need a bit of colour? Better still, a bit of colour and company. Oooo! Even better than that, colour, company,  tea and… (dare I say it) cake!?

Well, last weekend Yankee Yarns took a road trip to Stitches in Birmingham. CHSI Stitches is the geek con for anyone who is lucky enough to have a yarn store. There, you are privy to all the workshops, all the demonstrations and all the new stuff. In fact, it is Europe’s largest trade show for all of the creative craft industries— That is the art, craft, needlecraft and hobby sector.

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Over 300 suppliers from all over the world converge to display their new and innovative products. If you think you get tempted to buy another skein of wool to hide in your stash everytime you walk into a wool shop, think what it was like for our Fearless Leader, Sara?

The pull was just too great for us and inspiration hit big style.Yankee Yarns is getting new stock to add to our already vibrant shelves.To say that we have had our Cake and eating it too is an understatement.

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We are excited to announce Yankee Yarns will now be the local cake house. Caron Cakes are 200g Aran goodness. To put it simply, thay are GORGEOUS diversity of colors that are 80% acrylic and 20% wool.

“I LOVE them!” said Sara. “I wanted to get one (at Stitches) but you can’t buy anything there.” So instead, Sara decided she just needed to stock it.This yarn is the perfect multipurpose yarn that is soft and versitile. It can be used for garments, accessories and home décor projects in knitting or crochet. Each vivid, variegated ball features five bright colors. Lush! And check out the names of each one. You just want to eat them up.

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Also on Sara’s list is Caron Simply Soft. It is 100% acrylic so it is both machine washable and will tumble dry on a low heat!

The proverbial icing on the cake comes in the form of some new and innovative needles. HiyaHiya Needles are completely interchangeable needles. Sara was bubbling with excitment. “Straight and circular. One set makes everything. Every length!”

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In addition to the new stock, Yankee Yarns is happy to announce we are now in Crochet Now Magazine for the next five months in the Shop Local section. If you come in and buy a magazine and spend £15 or more, you get a coupon to fill in and Crochet Now will send you 3 free gifts!

Speaking of crochet, we have a lovely little pattern for you. African Flowers! Head over to Ravelry for the free pattern, including full colour tutorial. You can make them and put them out on their own to use as coasters or you can attach them and make a blanket out of them. Really, your creativity is the limit. They make lovely house-warming gifts. Heaven knows we have enough stash yarn to work through and this will help with your Stash Bust Challenge for the year.

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So let’s get hookin’! And remember to send us pictures of your creations so we can get them on our Rogue’s Gallery. We just love to see what you are working on!

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Cast On, Knit Up, Drop Out: Understanding Knitting Patterns

HEY!

PEOPLE OF THE WORLD!

KNIT UP!

KNIT UP!

In doing some research on Timothy Leary, I came across some rather groovy experimental videos. He said that the natural state of the brain was chaos. It is when we are overloaded by information and stimuli that we are able to be reprogramed. Basically, out of chaos comes a kind of order.

Lights and colours kept flashing before me and my mind suddenly snapped to that pattern I had been agonising over. The feeling of gaining some kind of clarity comes at the darnedest times. I stopped doing the work I was doing and went to my knitting basket, pulled out the pattern and just took the time to read it. Now at this point, many of you might be saying to your self, “No duh! Who doesn’t read the pattern before you start?” The answer, my friend, is LOTS OF PEOPLE. But it’s not about just reading the pattern. It’s about becoming one with it.

At the last knitting circle I attended at Bugman’s Bar with the Knitting Kninjas, I mentioned how I was still studying the pattern I was currently working on. One of the ladies was nonplussed. “You study it? I just start it!” she said. One of the beginners looked at my pattern and mearly shook her head. “I’ll never get there,” she sighed.

Knitting patterns can be very confusing. The abbreviations and symbols can look as if it is some ancient language. Throw in some runes and you have something you would see on an alien’s information display in its helmet. (he he) But seriously, it looks daunting. Once you become familar with the chaos, the order appears. You just need to chunck it down. Take it line by line and take your time.

The first thing to do is become familiar with the knitting abbreviations. I bought a book when I first learned to knit. I carried it around with me in my knitting bag. 20170127_100027.jpg

I first got used to the basic ones which are:

K or k = knit stitch
P or p = purl stitch

CO= cast on

BO= Bind off

Inc= increase

Dec= decrease

Rep= repeat

sl= slip stitch or slip a number of stitches

YO= yarn over as in taking the yarn over the needle

Tog= together as in knit two stitches together

Work Even= continue to what you have been doing without increasing or decreasing

Maintain Pattern= this means continue to do what you have been doing whilst dcreasing or increasing on the rows given.

Another helpful bit of advice was to print out a list of abbreiviations, laminate them and keep them in your knitting bag. I found a list on the Craft Yarn Council’s Yarn standards page.

It is a feeling of absolute joy when I all of a sudden “Get” the pattern. The soundtrack in my mind suddenly snaps into Johnny Nash’s “I Can See Clearly Now” and the cinematography becomes all golden. A very nice lady and self proclaimed Old Hippie told me once, “You just can’t rush things, sugar. Take your time. Breathe in…out and it all becomes clear.” (Thanks Mom)

You can find detailed help on how to understand knitting patterns on Wikihow.

We call this process “turning on.” And secondly, we seek to express the revelation, the glory, and the confusion and the paradox which comes to us from turning on in acts of glorification, of communication, of expressing the wonder and the meaning. It’s this process of acting it out that is called “tuning in.” But in order to turn on and tune in, you must of course “drop out.” — Timothy Leary

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X-treme Knit (& Crochet )

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I had been juggling four projects: Two for duty, one for necessity and the last for love.

It was the proverbial eleventh hour and the “one for love”, a crocheted blanket, was slowing me down. All four were promised for Monday morning and I feared the worst. I started them all a month before but now I would need to work through the weekend to finish them all. To be fair, it had started out with two projects. That had been achievable. However, my time had been hijacked by the “two for duty” (knitted blankets).  They had not been planned. They had been “requested” by a family member so I found it difficult to say no. The ”one for necessity”, a set of washcloths and dishtowels,  were knitted up without flourish, unfortunately. I always like to add a wee bit of whimsy to even my most utilitarian projects. The time-crunch meant that the one for necessity was condemned to a purely functional design. I moved from project to project with focus and determination. The clock mocked me with its neutral rigidity. I had spent the weekend hopped up on black coffee, Rage Against The Machine and the determination of a caged fighter in the last round.

All four of the projects got done.

[Queue inspirational Rocky Balboa music and listen to the crowd inside my head cheer— I stand victorious with my arms up in the air and…..] OUCH!!!

A shard of pain shot down through my middle finger and exploded into my palm.Please pass me the muscle pain relief cream. It seems I have sprained my middle finger metacarpal

Sprained fingers like this happen to basketball players, rugby players, kung fu masters and boxers! I sat in my GP’s surgery looking sheepish as my doctor cocked his head and smiled at me like a parent who wants to reprimand a toddler who just fell into a mud puddle. He gently informed me I had sprained finger due to repetitive strain associated with overuse. Basically, I knitted and crocheted too long without proper breaks.

 

Other knitters and hookers I know all said they had known my pain in one form or another. Crick in the neck, back pains, eye strain, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and weight gain ( aka Yo Yarn Tuffet!!!)  are the crosses we bear for our pastime. It is a common feeling that knitters and hookers feel they cannot stop because either they want to meet a deadline or just want to get as much done before the baby/husband/kids need us. One lady told me that she feels industrious when she is knitting. If she is binge watching Netflix, “knitting helps take away the guilt of being a lazy git”. Sometimes we just want to be in on something really cool and want to hurry up and get it done to be included in on the fun! Here’s an example from our very own fearless leader:

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So with this in mind, I have collated some of the advice given to me by some of our more expert and sensible colleagues:

  • Take frequent breaks! Ten to 15 minutes is all it takes.
  • Rotate your wrists after every row.
  • Mind your posture. Keep your shoulders down and your back straight. Get a backrest pillow.
  • Avoid knitting with arms on a surface. This puts pressure on the nerves of your arms.
  • Wear a wrist brace
  • Keep a small tension ball in your knitting bag. Squeeze it ease the tension in my hands and fingers.
  • Don’t have too many projects going at once.
  • Have a timer go off after 30 minutes. Get up and move around. Stretch arms, legs and back. Rotate your neck and wrists. Wiggle your fingers. Go make a cup of tea!
  • Use a heating pad around your neck and shoulders.
  • Use fingerless craft gloves with a good supporting wrist. Keep it in your knitting bag.
  • Keep pain relief cream in your Knitting Bag. Apply it when necessary to wrists and fingers.
  • Use a quilter’s thimble on index finger
  • Use ergonomic hooks!!! Wooden needles, especially KnitPro Cubics are easier on the hands.
  • Make sure you have good lighting and a comfortable chair.
  • Do hand and wrist warm-ups before you start!!!! Make a fist (or use a tension ball) and squeeze for 3 seconds and release. 10-15 reps. Then do Finger touches. Thumb to index, thumb to middle finger, thumb to ring finger, thumb to pinky and then back again.

    Ultimately, we all love our skill, our hobby, our obsession. We want to be able to do it indefinitely. We need to be smart and protect our future by making sure we don’t hurt ourselves now. Too much of anything is not a good thing. As all the wise folk say, “Everything in moderation.”

  • My favourite quote that can apply to this (as well as to other things):

 

She Comes In Colours

It is the first week of 2017. The festive frenzy of December is all over except for the shouting and the tell-tale signs of overindulgence around the waistline. The cold and frosty weather makes me want to cuddle in with a cup of coffee, my knitting and enjoy these last few days of comfort before I hit the office grind. However, I am mindful that perhaps I need to move around a bit.17-01-05-19-57-43-970_deco.jpg Luckily, the weather has been rather dry so everyday this week I have bundled up and ventured out for a walk in the dead of winter.

Who said dead? The colours have been absolutely inspiring! The beauty of drawing inspiration for the next project is out there! I admit, the idea of studying the Colour Wheel  and creating mood boards can feel a bit overwhelming and time consuming. I already have an all consuming hobby. Creating mood boards just seems like it would take me away from all my proposed knitting and crochet projects!

Our fearless leader, Sara at Yankee Yarns, let me in on a great little secret. All the hard work has already been done for us on Pintrest. You just need to do a search, print it off and dance right on over to the shop and pick out the yarn. Or you can do what I do. I store a bunch of pallets on my phone. Check out Sara’s collection on the Yankee Yarns board. You can see the ones the I have picked for my board. I am basically planning cushions and throws for each room in my house!


A simple search for colour schemes or pallets brings up a plethora of ideas. Sara puts together project kits for her customers regularly. wp-1483645572625.jpgThe last one offered at Yankee Yarns included a pattern for a Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice Cozy Nights Ripple Afghan, the six balls of yarn and a crochet hook. Since I am more of a knitter than a “hooker”, it was great to be able to go into Yankee Yarns and get a bit of schooling in crochet. The classes are 1.5 hour blocks on Mondays 12-2:30, 7:30pm-9pm Wednesdays 10-2:30, Thursdays 10-2:30, Fridays 10-2:30, and Saturdays 11-2. Just give Sara a ring.

 

At this rate, I am actually praying for a big snow day so I can get going on my next project. Aren’t we all???dr-who-knitting-meme

Manchester Terrier Hat: aka The Mabel Hat

 

There is always something inspiring about getting together with friends to knit. I always learn something new. Sometimes what I learn is a new skill or a different technique on how to perfect a stitch. Other times I learn about people and what makes them tick. It is these little glimpses into other people that make me truly grow in my craft.

One Friday afternoon, I sat at the shop with Janet who was working on the tiniest little hat.

“Is that for a doll?” I asked.

“No, it’s for a charity,” said Janet. She went on to tell me about Gracie, her Manchester terrier who was the smallest in her litter with the biggest personality. Janet lost Gracie at 14 months to congenital renal failure that is common in the Manchester Terrier dog. Janet went on to tell me the story of the breeders, Phil and Estella. Estella gave Janet Pixie. Pixie’s pup, Mabel is on the calendar dog for January resplendent in her little hat.It is these hats Janet has almost continuously on her needles.

In the last two years, Janet has knitted up anywhere from 150 to 200 little wool hats. These are sold at the dog shows and on the Rattustrap Manchester Terriers website and all the money has gone to charity. These have been bought by loving dog owners all over the world from Finland to Florida!

These hats can be adapted to fit larger dogs and other critters around your house. Even cats (if they let you. You know what they are like!) Our fearless leader, Sara, made some for her kids and for herself. Janet wrote me out the pattern and I have a Mabel Hat on my sticks right now. Yankee Yarns’s resident designer has written it up on in our Ravelry. Get this pattern for free here!

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Sara in her Mabel Hat

The Stash Buster Challenge, 2017!

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We all do it. We all hoard wool. Like dragons guarding treasure, we are protective of our spun balls of colour. I have a friend that calls her hoard, “My Precious”. Another friend calls it her “Tangled Web”. I call mine, My Yarniverse .

Whatever you call it, it is our Stash. To some of us, the size of it is of great pride and joy. To others, it is a secret that must be kept from the man of the house.

I met up with another knitter for coffee the other day. Let’s call her “Jane”. She is a novice (she’s only been knitting since June) and already she has amassed a great hoard of yarn. Some of it was inherited from her husband’s late auntie. It was this pile of historic yarn, abandoned W.I.P.s and vintage needles that got Jane knitting.

“I can cast on, do stockinette and so far I have made a few scarves,” she said. Her eyes were ablaze as she opened up a canvas bag. Within the bag were six skeins of naturally dyed, hand spun, pure wool yarn from crossbred sheep and alpaca that she bought from a seller at a craft fair. ALPACA!

16-12-07-21-17-11-765_deco.jpgBashfully she looked up from the bag and whispered, “I am not sure how I am going to smuggle it into the wool I already got at home without him asking how much it cost.” I nodded quietly calculating there must have been about £70 pounds worth of yarn there.

“Chances are your hubby may never know,” I said. And then we Googled closed storage containers together from one of the value shops and planned her the Smuggling In Ops.

There is no way of understanding exactly how this yarn addiction begins. It almost always starts off innocently by finding a pattern that calls for a certain amount of balls for the size you want to make, and then you quite possibly buy one extra (just in case) or find that your tension was really rather tight so you are left with a bit. But ultimately, you wander around a shop looking for laundry detergent, toothpaste and bin liners and find three skeins of wool for the price of two. You see a cobalt blue looking one then remember that lovely cowl pattern you saw on Ravelry. You remember that you decided to make one at some point in the near future. But what if in the future these skeins aren’t on sale? You think to yourself you had better get them now, just in case. You think to yourself “that would look so pretty on (insert person’s name of your choice with the glorious blue eyes HERE)”. You are pleased. You put it in your cart and spot another skein in a different color. Only this one is not in the sale. But this one is even softer and the color is like autumn walked into the shop and kissed you on the forehead. So you buy four.  It begins. You store it in the boot of your car until your husband leaves the house. You run out as soon as he has turned the corner and bring the wool in and…. Stash it…. True story…

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Well, here comes 2017 and with it comes new lines of wool. That stash is starting to bulge a bit and it may be the time to get some of that old stuff out of the dark and onto your needles and hooks. The New Year is all about new beginnings so Yankee Yarns would like to throw out the dragon-scaled gauntlet!

fb.me/CosyCrochetbyMarieBy Marie King at Cosy Crochet

We challenge you to make stuff out of your stash. Only your stash!

And we would like you to send us your photos so we can put them up in our gallery. Of course we will give you props. When you send us your photo, we would like to know:

  1. Your name (alias or just first name is ok)
  2. How long you have had that wool in your stash
  3. And if there is a story attached to the yarn, then even better!
  4. Send to Yankeeyarns@gmail.com and we will showcase your work in the Stash Buster Challenge tab.

Do you just want to make squares? Check this out. A knit for Charity is a great way to stash bust.

Now a word from Sara, our fearless leader at Yankee Yarns :

“The pink vest Loxley wearing is 10 year old wool with the green stripe new wool. It was the exact colour she wanted. Mix the old and the new because I didn’t know it then but it’s exactly what I needed now. You know your own taste, so when you see something you can’t pass up trust your own taste because chances are you’ll end up (eventually) making something you love.”

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Some Stash Buster mini projects.

 

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